Misandry: When Feminism Defeats Itself

As a staunch, self-proclaimed Libertarian, nothing is more sacred to me than the principles of liberty and equality. Indeed, it is upon these very principles that the foundations of Feminism are also built. In an environment in which anyone, be it a class of peoples defined by superficial differences or sporadic individuals similarly discriminated against, I believe that inherent in our existence is a moral obligation on both those discriminated against and their privileged peers to endeavor to correct such social, judicial, and economic incongruities. It is in the light of this general, nonspecific moral obligation that I align myself with women, minorities, men, majorities, and disenfranchised individuals alike, for to encompass preference for any particular struggle for liberty and equality would be to resemble the root of oppression itself.

Note: Some people do not believe that such moral obligations are inherent in their existence, which they view as some incarnation of the notion of social contract. To clarify, I also believe in and defend the right of individuals to maintain this position of dis-compassionate autonomy. Such is their choice. Mine is one of compassionate Libertarianism, which teaches us that all obligations are self inflicted, at every individuals discretion. All non-voluntary obligations amount to tyranny, whether petty or absolute or somewhere in between. So when I talk of a moral obligation, understand that I mean only that I have obligated myself with one, and that to attempt to force another to adopt my philosophy would be to unmake it.

One possibly unfortunate effect of this stance is that I am forced by my own moral position to defend the rights of people and groups with whom I disagree, such as vocal neo-nazis, radical fundamentalists, drug war crusaders, and gun control advocates. One fortunate side effect is that my moral position is immune to accusations of political bias, despite having been born of largely political origins in Libertarian philosophy.

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